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Black-blotched porcupinefish, Diodon liturosus, juvenile, Green Island, Taiwan

This porcupinefish looks happy even though it is a poor swimmer. If danger arises, the fish inflates itself by swallowing water until it is completely round and all its spines point straight out. Its skin contains a toxin called tetrodotoxin, which is at least 1200 times more toxic than cyanide. The toxin is produced by bacteria from the fish’s diet.

Charles Darwin mentioned the porcupinefish, saying that other researchers had observed the fish floating alive in the stomach of sharks, and that the fish had been seen eating its way out through the side of the shark.
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Photographer Magnus Lundgren Mail info@magnuslundgren.com Phone +46 (0)708 753610 Address: Hans Sotares gränd 11, SE-239 35 Skanör, Sweden Project wildwondersofchina.com Mail info@wildwondersofchina.com Phone +46 8 583 518 31
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7000x4781 / 10.9MB
www.magnuslundgren.com
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NIGHT OCEAN EXHIBITION [NOW IN MALMÖ]
Black-blotched porcupinefish, Diodon liturosus, juvenile, Green Island, Taiwan<br />
<br />
This porcupinefish looks happy even though it is a poor swimmer. If danger arises, the fish inflates itself by swallowing water until it is completely round and all its spines point straight out. Its skin contains a toxin called tetrodotoxin, which is at least 1200 times more toxic than cyanide. The toxin is produced by bacteria from the fish’s diet.<br />
<br />
Charles Darwin mentioned the porcupinefish, saying that other researchers had observed the fish floating alive in the stomach of sharks, and that the fish had been seen eating its way out through the side of the shark.